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Get Paid to Walk Around Tokyo? Stchar! and Advertising’s Future

by Abhinav Chaturvedi Especially during economic downturns, it is essential for businesses to create a compelling case for their brands. Countries and companies that succeed in this may be able to weather the downturn. As high streets continue to struggle amidst inflation and the impact of disastrous coronavirus lockdowns, Japan, Inc. is taking advertising to […]

Credit - Stchar!

by Abhinav Chaturvedi

Especially during economic downturns, it is essential for businesses to create a compelling case for their brands.

Countries and companies that succeed in this may be able to weather the downturn. As high streets continue to struggle amidst inflation and the impact of disastrous coronavirus lockdowns, Japan, Inc. is taking advertising to the micro-level.

Wanna Technologies is now offering up to 1,200 yen ($9) per hour for people to walk around Tokyo with the Stchar! app and backpack system.

Potential walkers must first download the Stchar! app and store it in a Stchar! backpack. The backpack has an iPad-sized pocket with a clear screen, and the Stchar! app will display advertisements and commercials as you walk.

Consider walking around Tokyo, admiring the view and sounds, walking, earning by a means to exercise, and earning revenue. If you have an iPad, you can use it.

Stchar! bags, which are required to use the service, are currently out of stock now, however, they will be free during the launch period, and they’ll be back in stock later, according to their official Twitter account.

Currently, walkers can only earn money by staying within an 804-kilometer (500-mile) radius of the Hachiko statue in Tokyo’s Shibuya district, but the company intends to expand further in the future.

There are some limitations – walkers will not be compensated for any walking outside of the designated radius, and advertisements on the screen must be paused when entering private property such as convenience stores and department stores.

To begin, simply press a few buttons on the app to begin displaying the ads and begin walking around the designated area. All they ask is that you turn off the advertisements whenever you enter a convenience store, business, or private property. The only drawback is that it does not work during the rain.

Is this a successful strategy? The app has great potential to get people out of their houses and into retail areas. Local governments aiming to increase high street profits or promote tourism might see Stchar! as a boon.

At the same time, cheeky users could think of several goofy hacks, such as placing the bag on a pet or another moving creature or vehicle, leading to an absurd turn of events. More seriously, do we as individuals want to have advertisements everywhere we go?

The developed world is already saturated with advertising. As climate change highlights ever-more problems created by excess consumerism and waste, is Stachr!, even during an economic recession, really a good answer to the globe’s problems?

Sooner or later, assuming that the gimmick is a success, we may be looking at a new set of regulations and policies to implement such technologies

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